• Author: Carol Wirth
Carol
Carol Wirth is the Co-Founder of Glimsity. Carol is a story producer and interviewer. Her primary goal when out shooting video is to make everyone feel comfortable in front of the lens.

“After more than 15 years in public relations with roots in journalism, I reached a point where I needed to find what I was passionate about in my profession or find a new one. I thought I would come out of the process changing careers. Instead, I found what I truly love about the one I’ve already got: Telling people’s stories. Everyone’s got a story – it’s what makes people (and people make up businesses) who they are, it’s their personality, their difference. I enjoy finding the story, pulling it out, making it relevant and communicating it to the public. In my adapted career, I simply found another way to communicate the stories – through documentary video.”

You can contact Carol at carol@glimsity.com

Last Christmas, Santa dropped a joggling board on the porch for my two sons ages 5 and 7. The joggling board was painted in its traditional Charleston green and blended right in with the porch furniture.

Like many of you reading this post now, I had no idea what a joggling board was. Was it a ‘jog-ing’ board as my 7 year old referred to it? That seemed likely. Or a ‘joplin’ board? Don’t know what that would be, but the term seemed more appropriate.
Guerry-Lumber-Joggling-Board
No, it’s joggling. Joggle: to move shakily or jerkily. A joggling board is a long piece of wood measuring 10 to 16 feet long that is suspended by two wooden stands at either end that are constructed like rockers.

It’s wide enough to sit on, or serve cake.
Joggling cake
The joggling board was originated in South Carolina in the early 1800s from a model sent from Scotland, supposedly with exercise in mind. It’s been said it was a sign of friendship to invite someone to sit on your joggling board for a visit on the porch. The board is typically made of pliable Southern pine, so you can bounce on it. And you can stand on it and rock side to side.

Santa told us he used some Low Country elves at Guerry Lumber to help supply our timeless porch furniture.

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At Glimsity, in our regular work day we talk to a lot of people, collect useful nuggets of information, gather insight and identify trends locally. Lil is an acronym for Local inside look (Lil). At Lil G Blog, we want to share the good stuff with you. It’s everything that doesn’t fit into our short videos.